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Posts Tagged ‘reverse’

Jugaad – A new discipline for the economy of the future

April 2, 2012 3 comments

It’s been called ‘low-cost’ or ‘frugal’; now recognizing India’s excellence – although not monopoly – in the domain of ultra-low-cost innovation, it’s finally been given a Hindi name: Jugaad.

Traditionally, Jugaad are locally-made small trucks that provide low-cost transportation for people and goods in rural India. These small trucks, equipped with an engine derived from an irrigation pump,  typically cost less than $2,000. Recently, the use of the term Jugaad has been extended to describe an improvised arrangement or work-around, which has to be used because of lack of resources or excessive constraints.

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Innovation is a form of win-win negotiation

May 11, 2010 1 comment

Almost three decades ago, Ury and Fisher published their ground-breaking negotiation method, Getting to Yes that laid the foundation of win-win negotiation. Reflecting back on my early years in B2B Account Management and my current activities in Technology, I was struck by the parallels between win-win negotiation and innovation. Read more…

What comes after Reverse Innovation?

February 4, 2010 2 comments

In a previous post I have argued that evolution from globalisation to reverse innovation as outlined by Vijay Govindarajan is driven not only by the revenue gap between mature and emerging markets but also by the rise of simplicity, a powerful undercurrent that pushes simplicity to emerge as something that is not just cheaper but also more reliable, more effective, more authentic, more beautiful, in short: desirable.

What does this tell us about what comes after reverse innovation? Putting in a chart the 4 phases of the evolution so far, the answer becomes clear. Read more…

The rise of simplicity: the reason behind the success of reverse innovation

February 2, 2010 3 comments

Thanks to a number of spectacular successes obtained by blue-chip companies in recent years, Reverse Innovation is becoming a popular trend. Examples include GE’s portable ultra-sound equipment designed in China and sold worldwide, LG’s low cost air conditioner designed in India and sold worldwide, Renault’s Logan low-cost model designed for Eastern European markets and now selling on Western Europe, etc.

In an enlightening article, Vijay Govindarajan outlines a historical perspective from globalisation to reverse innovation, and highlights the key driver behind this evolution: the revenue gap between developed and emerging markets.  But there are other drivers that may be less visible but no less powerful. Read more…